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EHPU Policy

General remark: The EHPU is not in favour of harmonizing the existing different national requirements in Europe through a central European regulation. The great variety of conditions for our sport in Europe would not be met satisfactorily by a single Pan-European regulation and there is a risk that the freedom and flexibility for our airsport would be reduced in most countries.

The differences between national regulations are no obstacle for hang gliding and paragliding because there are guest rules which allow pilots to fly in other countries with the equipment they are allowed to fly at home, if they are IPPI card holders. Please check the guest rules of each country using the member links here.


EHPU Airspace Position Paper updated 2010

EHPU Ecological Position Paper 2011       Case study  'Birds of prey and free flying'

Comment sent to the European Commission describing the EHPU position on better regulation in General Aviation (Aircraft other than Complex Motor Powered Aircraft, used in Non-commercial activities).
Comment sent to the European Commission describing the EHPU position on licensing and air operations.
Comment sent to the European Commission describing the EHPU position on Airspace classification.
Comment sent to the European Commission describing the EHPU position on Airspace charging.

Proposal of THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL on common rules in the field of civil aviation:

amending Regulation (EC) No 1592/2002 of 15 July 2002 (on common rules in the field of civil aviation and establishing a European Aviation Safety Agency) to include the regulation of Air Operations and Licensing (Pilot Proficiency), concerning only gliding, ballooning and powered flying.

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European Regulations where exemption has been achieved

- EC Regulation on Airworthiness

The EC Regulation No 216/2008 (repealing Council Directive 91/670/EEC, EC Regulation 1592/2002 and Directive 2004/36/EC) states:
"aeronautical products should be subject to certification to verify that they meet essential airworthiness requirements".
Article 4 of this regulation states: "This regulation shall not apply to aircraft referred to in Annex II"
Annex II states: "Aircraft to which Article 4 does not apply are aircraft which fall in one of the following categories:
...gliders with a structural mass of less than 80 kg when single seater or 100 kg when two seater, including those which are foot launched...
...any other aircraft with a total mass without pilot of less than 70 kg."

The above states that there is no European regulation for airworthiness of hang gliders and paragliders. Airworthiness requirements for hang gliders and paragliders continue to fall under national rule making.

- EC Regulation on insurance requirements for passenger flying and against risks of war and terror

EC Regulation No 785/2004 of 21 April 2004 states:
Air carriers and aircraft operators referred to in Article 2 shall be insured in accordance with this regulation as regards their aviation-specific liability in respect of passengers, baggage, cargo and third parties. The insured risks shall include acts of war, terrorism, hijacking, act of sabotage, unlawful seizure of aircraft and civil commotion.
Article 2 "...This regulations shall not apply to foot-launched flying machines (including powered paragliders and hang gliders)...
...This regulation shall not apply in so far as the insurance obligations under this regulation relating to the risks of war and terrorism are concerned for aircraft, including gliders, with a MTOM of less than 500 kg, and microlights, which are used for non-commercial purposes, or are used for local flight instruction which does not entail the crossing of international borders".

That means the insurance requirements for hang gliders and paragliders continue to fall under national rule making.


EAS Report

EAS Newsletter January 2006

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